Category Archives: Uncategorized

Kindness in the News

This is a great story about a young woman who took time to notice another person in need of help. A few minutes of their exchange went viral and has now expanded into the awareness of others.

That’s the magic of Kindness!

READ HERE

The Science of Altruism

Take a listen to this NPR segment on a very intriguing but disturbing topic, child psychopaths. This interview with Barbara Bradley Hagerty breaks down how this behavior manifests itself in children. She talks about the emotional center in the brain, or the limbic system and how children who demonstrate psychopathic traits have a dysfunction in that area, i.e., the amygdala, the part of the brain that processes fear. Data has shown this part is smaller in those who show psychopathic tendencies.

The interview cites an intensely disturbing account of a 6-year-old girl whose parents witnessed her attempting to strangle her baby sister. It gets even more alarming from there. Hagerty explained that these kids are not only void of any empath, the idea of punishment doesn’t have any influence on them. One approach by medical professionals is emphasizing the idea of rewards as opposed to using punishment as a means to correct behavior.

See also Hagerty’s in-depth article in the Atlantic on child psychopaths.

With regard to my platform of Kindness–(and Kindness at Noon), this topic is at the opposite end of the spectrum but worth examining, especially because it involves children. There is hope that some can be helped through specialized methodology. For kids who will be successfully steered onto a more altruistic path, they are the future in paving the way for practicing kindness. While I was writing The Global Kindness Revolution, future generations was one of the focal points. What will kindness look like 100 years from now? With the breakneck pace of technology, I wanted to dig in and diagnose our collective mindset and the trajectory we’re now taking.

This excerpt from the book’s introduction explains the concept behind genuine kindness as a focused practice (Kindness at Noon):

Imagine if approximately 3,734,000 or 51% of us decided to align our mental energy fields to positively influence the rest of the world! That’s what the Global Kindness Revolution is all about. This is the first time ever that we’ve had the social media tools with which to affect everyone connected through two billion smartphones and a billion computers. If 51% of the population decides to try it, we can strengthen the vibrational field of kindness and weaken the violence and negativity that plagues us all.

For far too long we’ve been operating under the notion that we’re alien to one another. Wars and hatred of those not like us has twisted our thinking into accepting this as the “new norm.” We cannot allow this to continue to grow like a poisonous fungus, destroying our capacity to think clearly and act in rational ways with compassion, not only for our environment, but for others who are less fortunate. We must learn to embrace each other and in turn, improve our planet. That is our challenge and we can meet it together for just five minutes (or more) a day.

The New Science is finally catching up with spirituality and is in the process of providing validation for what was once deemed “unexplainable.” The exercises and visualizations in this book can now be viewed as technological tools, not some way out “woo-woo” theory.

Now, thanks to scientific explanation such as String Theory in the new physics, which postulates that at any given moment, there are eleven different dimensions to reality, or Chaos Theory, which demonstrates how the flapping of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil eventually becomes part of a tornado in Toronto—we know the techniques described in this book have scientific explanations for these experiences and their effectiveness. You don’t have to walk on fire to believe these things are possible and in fact, we DO have the power to make the world a better place for seven generations to come.

More than twenty-five hundred years ago, the Buddha described what scientists are now calling the smallest part of material, “subatomic particles.” If we take two of these tiny particles, invisible to the naked eye, and expand them to the size of a pea, the space between subatomic particles would be two miles. It’s the flow between the peas wherein lies our interconnectedness to others—the life force or FLOW, what some call God, or other deities, exist. It is within that Flow that healing and expanded consciousness occurs in response to minds focused and determined, motivated in part by their DNA and the experiences that affect it. We’ll call the Flow “The Light of Kindness” as this book helps us to learn, live and heal within this Light, and to help brighten this light in others.

Quote of the Day: Jack Kerouac

Timeless Quote from the great Jack Kerouac:

“Practice Kindness all day to everybody and you will realize you’re already in heaven now.”

 

Read more on Kerouac HERE

The Loss of a Queen

It’s Scary Loving an Old Person: The Loss of a Queen

Have you ever met someone that you loved immediately almost before a word was spoken? That’s how it was with me and Queen Mother Nana. It was as if our spirits recognized each other and filled the room between us with their dance. But she was old and disabled-could I risk loving her only to lose her?

There we were in 2002, a still-feisty community activist and beloved elder from North Philly, known to the community as Josephine “Mom” Johnson, and a white, middle-aged, middle-class human rights activist, author and filmmaker. We’d heard about each other from some of the students in my former creative writing class at Graterford Prison where she and two other remarkable women had volunteered for over thirty-five years, bringing African studies to many behind bars yearning for an identity, community and culture. In these women they found mothers. As did I. Nana told me that they prayed for me by phone every night.

In the sixties, Nana worked with then DA Ed Rendell to end gang violence, to close nuisance bars in declining city neighborhoods and advocated for stronger liquor control laws. She took Yellow Cab to court for their discriminatory practices in services in black communities.

In 1979, she’d begun outreach work at Graterford where they adopted her Pan African Studies Community Education Program (PASCEP) from Temple University. She earned a Bachelor of Historical Education degree from the Pan-African Federation Organization.

In the late eighties, she visited several African countries, delivering educational supplies and over 2,000 books, helping to establish a school in Ghana. On every trip she took school children (and adults) from N. Philly to Africa, instilling in them pride of their heritage. She was “enstooled” in 1992 as Queen Mother Nana Ama Akoffo 2nd.

Philadelphia City Council and the State Senate recognized her several times through the years for her work giving voice to many social issues like housing, voter registration, family unity, teen pregnancy and police abuse.

Nana introduced me to the Incarcerated Community, families of the men in my classes. It was through her strong support of my work that I was able to earn the trust of those with loved ones in prison with whom I was writing a book about them and the criminal justice system. The book, Celling America’s Soul: Torture & Transformation in our Prisons and Why We Should Care has been called by people in prison “the best book in print that describes prisons from most every perspective,” was immediately banned. Families were selling the book out of the trunks of their cars at Broad and Erie. Fresh hope blossomed as we were all sure once the public read about the human suffering funded by unaware taxpayers, conditions would change for the better. Twelve years later, people are just beginning to awaken to the horrors and costs of mass incarceration. I also made a documentary, which includes an interview with Nana, Healing Justice: a journey into Shadow America, which is available at www.Trustonekindness.com

By the time I met her in 2002, she was confined to a walker and a wheel chair, her lungs impaired by breathing chemicals during the years she ran a successful hair salon. Yet even from her wheelchair she was still helping the community. Whatever the need was, she’d put out word that a refrigerator was needed and one would become available. Each week, at the senior high rise where she lived in an impeccably neat apartment, she delegated distribution of loaves of bread donated by the Vermont Bread Company. Whenever someone needed a sympathetic ear, she was there and did enjoy a bit of gossip now and then. She also grumbled a lot as she became less independent.

This was a woman who glowed with love, who radiated strength and compassion, and who gave us and the community the kind of mothering we didn’t know we needed. She was 94 when she passed into Spirit.

I am glad I took the risk of loving her. Of course I’ll always miss her, her spirit, her love, her sense of humor and her outrage at injustice. I’ll do my best to try to walk in her shoes.

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Judith Trustone is an award-winning author, filmmaker and human rights advocate. The Global Kindness Revolution: How Together We Can Heal Violence, Racism and Meanness to be released in early 2016. Her documentaries include Soothing and Nurturing the Human Spirit; Healing Justice: A Journey into Shadow America; How to Create a Kindness Circle (on YouTube)

 

My Interview With Jack Canfield!

Check out my recent interview with world-renowned author, Jack Canfield (Chicken Soup For the Soul) about the Global Kindness Revolution and its mission to get 51% of the planet’s population to join the cause and eradicate racism, hatred and meanness, the underlying theme in my upcoming book:

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A Call For Kindness In Response to Violence

From the Portland Press Herald:

Pastors urge grieving Oregon town to counter rampage with kindness

ROSEBURG, Ore. — A pastor whose daughter survived last week’s deadly rampage in a college classroom told his congregation on Sunday that “violence will not have the last word” in this southern Oregon timber town…[click link above]

Do Refugees’ Lives Matter?

Do refugee and immigrant lives matter? It was just a news flash caught out of the corner of my eyes as I tried to ignore the all-Trump-news-all- day cycle that has gripped the media. The TV screen showed an overloaded rubber boat with refugees from Syria and Afghanistan cheering as they landed on the shore of one of the Greek islands, stops along the way to an uncertain future. Standing in a classic George Washington Crossing the Delaware pose, instead of weapons they held selfies aloft, one man in the bow holding a selfie stick as if it were a flag of freedom. Another held up his newborn baby triumphantly as a weeping woman carried a small child above the waves. Kneeling and kissed the earth, a bearded man shed tears of relief. The news clip ended with the bedraggled refugees, in a single file, escorted uphill to a village by authorities, their futures, their very lives, uncertain. They may be forced to return to what for many is uncertain death.

Trump has exposed a darkness lurking within the human spirit that unleashes hatred and fury toward these “others” making meanness and total lack of compassion the norm, here and in Europe in a rerun of the Know-Nothing Party which flourished here in the mid-1800s as an anti-immigrant party. Philip Roth refers to these people as “the indigenous American berserk!” I couldn’t help but recall when a dolphin was recently stranded on the beach where I was staying in Florida. The attention, tenderness and the hours spent cooling the animal, strategizing what to do and occasional reports to the curious crowd about what the authorities were doing when they drew blood and took vital signs.

Three hours later, the struggling dolphin was carried in a sling across the hot beach to a waiting truck that would take it to Sea World for “rehabilitation.” The sweaty crowd cheered, our emotions touched by observing the recue, an act of resistance, to push back against the harm humans cause to the natural world that, according to Terry Maseur of LA, a hummingbird rehabber, “draws out raw emotions that unleash our deepest insecurities about our humanity, mortality and place in the natural world.” My tears flowed at the kindness shown by officials and the watching crowd. That compassion disappears under the dark cloud of nativism and nationalism shown by so many descendants of immigrants.

I heard about the signs for my ancestors saying “No Italians” and “No Irish” need apply. So much for my ancestors. The only true “Americans” are Native Americans upon whom we’ve heaped genocide and government policies that have almost destroyed the original settlers, who lived lightly on Mother Earth, thinking about the effects of any actions on seven generations to come. Those spewing hatred of immigrants should explore their own histories, what their ancestors endured to come to our shores for freedom from violence, religious persecution and the possibility of economic opportunity. A Native American suggested that they collect $500 from every American as a fine!

Imagine if instead of hating these 60 million refugees, 30 million of them children, seeking refuge from their violence-plagued countries, we welcomed them, embraced them with care and kindness, helping them become acclimated, treating them as compassionately as we treat dolphins…