Tag Archives: kindness

The Science of Altruism

Take a listen to this NPR segment on a very intriguing but disturbing topic, child psychopaths. This interview with Barbara Bradley Hagerty breaks down how this behavior manifests itself in children. She talks about the emotional center in the brain, or the limbic system and how children who demonstrate psychopathic traits have a dysfunction in that area, i.e., the amygdala, the part of the brain that processes fear. Data has shown this part is smaller in those who show psychopathic tendencies.

The interview cites an intensely disturbing account of a 6-year-old girl whose parents witnessed her attempting to strangle her baby sister. It gets even more alarming from there. Hagerty explained that these kids are not only void of any empath, the idea of punishment doesn’t have any influence on them. One approach by medical professionals is emphasizing the idea of rewards as opposed to using punishment as a means to correct behavior.

See also Hagerty’s in-depth article in the Atlantic on child psychopaths.

With regard to my platform of Kindness–(and Kindness at Noon), this topic is at the opposite end of the spectrum but worth examining, especially because it involves children. There is hope that some can be helped through specialized methodology. For kids who will be successfully steered onto a more altruistic path, they are the future in paving the way for practicing kindness. While I was writing The Global Kindness Revolution, future generations was one of the focal points. What will kindness look like 100 years from now? With the breakneck pace of technology, I wanted to dig in and diagnose our collective mindset and the trajectory we’re now taking.

This excerpt from the book’s introduction explains the concept behind genuine kindness as a focused practice (Kindness at Noon):

Imagine if approximately 3,734,000 or 51% of us decided to align our mental energy fields to positively influence the rest of the world! That’s what the Global Kindness Revolution is all about. This is the first time ever that we’ve had the social media tools with which to affect everyone connected through two billion smartphones and a billion computers. If 51% of the population decides to try it, we can strengthen the vibrational field of kindness and weaken the violence and negativity that plagues us all.

For far too long we’ve been operating under the notion that we’re alien to one another. Wars and hatred of those not like us has twisted our thinking into accepting this as the “new norm.” We cannot allow this to continue to grow like a poisonous fungus, destroying our capacity to think clearly and act in rational ways with compassion, not only for our environment, but for others who are less fortunate. We must learn to embrace each other and in turn, improve our planet. That is our challenge and we can meet it together for just five minutes (or more) a day.

The New Science is finally catching up with spirituality and is in the process of providing validation for what was once deemed “unexplainable.” The exercises and visualizations in this book can now be viewed as technological tools, not some way out “woo-woo” theory.

Now, thanks to scientific explanation such as String Theory in the new physics, which postulates that at any given moment, there are eleven different dimensions to reality, or Chaos Theory, which demonstrates how the flapping of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil eventually becomes part of a tornado in Toronto—we know the techniques described in this book have scientific explanations for these experiences and their effectiveness. You don’t have to walk on fire to believe these things are possible and in fact, we DO have the power to make the world a better place for seven generations to come.

More than twenty-five hundred years ago, the Buddha described what scientists are now calling the smallest part of material, “subatomic particles.” If we take two of these tiny particles, invisible to the naked eye, and expand them to the size of a pea, the space between subatomic particles would be two miles. It’s the flow between the peas wherein lies our interconnectedness to others—the life force or FLOW, what some call God, or other deities, exist. It is within that Flow that healing and expanded consciousness occurs in response to minds focused and determined, motivated in part by their DNA and the experiences that affect it. We’ll call the Flow “The Light of Kindness” as this book helps us to learn, live and heal within this Light, and to help brighten this light in others.

GKR PRESENTS: KINDNESS AT NOON FOR IMMIGRANTS/REFUGEES

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT!! Launching this spring: Kindness at Noon for Immigrants + Refugees. In light of the ongoing controversy over rights of the global citizen who find themselves migrating to another country; the enacted “Muslim Ban” in the US; Brexit in the UK; and the perilous dimensions of what it means to be a refugee in the 21st century, Kindness at Noon aims to raise awareness of this humanitarian crisis all of us are impacted by in one form or another.

Keep checking this blog for upcoming developments as we partner with local organizations on Resolutions in Support of Kindness at Noon, Every Day, Everywhere for Immigrants and Refugees.

Here’s an excerpt from my book, The Global Kindness Revolution: how together we can heal violence, racism, and meanness:

 

Chapter Three: Kindness to Immigrants & Refugees

Unless you’re Native American, most of us claiming this land, this America, as “ours,” are descendants of immigrants. My grandparents came here from Ireland, Italy, Austria and Russia and were not welcomed. Signs everywhere read “No Irish Need Apply” or “No Italians Need Apply.” Jews were treated even worse. My grandmother, Frances Bondy, came here from Odessa with her mother who reportedly spoke only Yiddish and was a hunchback. Family lore says that they lived in Florida where anti-Semitism flourished and that the KKK burned a cross on their lawn. They moved north to Bayonne, NJ, where they changed their name and the Jewish part of our history was erased, coming to light only after her death.

Black people were/are still living in the shadow of slavery, though lynching no longer occurs. The systemic discrimination that persists today is evident in areas such as housing and employment opportunities.

While anti-Semitism still exists, especially with members of the extreme right, today it’s the “other,” the people with darker skin, fleeing violence and possible death back home. We deem them “aliens” and in the process dehumanize them, even as sixty of them died in a van that was welded shut. By the time they were discovered by the side of a highway, they had decomposed into a gelatinous mess, causing us to lose our humanity.

The worst chapter in America’s relationship with immigrants is the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II, our most egregious example of immigrant hatred born of fear and ignorance, spawning the anti-immigrant “Know Nothing Party” in the mid-1800s. Just like today’s white supremacists who continue to wave the banner of hate. Now we’re building new prisons—a corrupt for-profit agenda—to house “aliens” and their children.

Our collective Mean Minds seem to be controlling so much of our national politics and policies. We consent to the utter demonizing of immigrants and refugees by Americans and their elected officials, who barrage our minds with the fear of the “other,” like we did back in those shameful times, rather than the compassion upon which this country was founded. We no longer welcome the “huddled masses yearning to breath free” to our shores. Our beloved Statue of Liberty has become a symbol of our hypocrisy. Other countries in the west have all demonstrated anti-immigrant sentiments.

Concurrent with the writing of this book was the massive controversy of “Brexit,” the UK’s vote to exit the European Union, largely based on fears of immigrants taking over the country due to the influx of newcomers over the past decade. Days after the vote a rash of xenophobic incidents were reported. Those from Muslim and Eastern European communities described being under attack as people were running up to them, screaming in their faces, “go home.” Racist graffiti began turning up in their neighborhoods. As the UK grappled with the ramifications of the controversial vote, hate of the “other” continued to spread.

In 2015, the Syrian refugee crisis was at its peak as millions fled to European shores, seeking asylum. As the crisis unfolded, several governments of the EU responded by enhancing border control, deportations, and actively discouraged refugees from making the journey. Human Rights groups voiced the urgency to fix the EU’s broken asylum system and emphasized the magnitude of the humanitarian need. An untold number of children lost their lives from both the Syrian civil war and resulting treacherous migrations to other countries. Stories of tragedy kept multiplying as countries such as Greece and Italy were tasked with rescue missions in the Mediterranean where thousands of migrants had drowned.

In 2014, tens of thousands of children traveling alone, seeking freedom from violence, sexual slavery, rape and death in their home countries were treated like animals. I’ll never be able to wipe from my memory the Arizona residents, thinking a busload of children going to a YMCA camp was part of the influx of child refugees streaming over our border with Mexico. The angry people screamed and cursed at the children, shouting violent threats, stopping just short of damaging the bus. I was ashamed of and afraid of my fellow Americans.

Imagine the trauma to those children, to say nothing of the certain PTSD in refugee children; imagine their bafflement at the adults acting violent and psychotic. As a result of pressure from the US to stop the children, Mexico is now acting with a severity never seen before. All children caught crossing their border are immediately turned back, without any evaluation of their asylum status or whether they would qualify for temporary residence. Desperate children are being denied safety and dignity, many returning to certain death or sexual slavery. This heartless treatment violates both Mexican asylum laws and now migrants must use drug cartels to reach the US, adding to the cartel’s enormous profits.

UNICEF reports nearly 28 million children globally are displaced by conflict. The United Nations has had to cut back on food and supplies for refugees from war torn Syria, Libya, Afghanistan and Iraq, among others, due to “inadequate funding.” In this country, efforts by the State Department to increase the number of accepted refugees have been resisted by people like Republican representative from Texas, Michael McCaul, who heads the House Homeland Security Committee. He claims allowing more refugees to come here would create a “federally funded jihadi pipeline” for Islamist militants. In his ignorance and xenophobia, he doesn’t realize that the refugee camps are the true breeding grounds for violence against America.

Someone reported that a Native American chief had tongue in cheek proposed that every non-Native now residing in the US pay a fine, as immigrants and descendants of immigrants, of $500 each to Native Americans for allowing us to remain in their country! An interesting idea…

 

A Transformational Act of Kindness

I was moved to tears reading this story by The Dodo:

Starving Dog Found Collapsed On Street Is Completely Transformed By Kindness

This starving dog, who had all but given up on the world, underwent an amazing transformation. And it’s all thanks to a little kindness…

Go here for the rest of this amazing story.

 

Mean Madison Avenue – Why we need a Global Kindness Revolution

[This is the first of occasional blogs commenting on various aspects of our culture.  I’m calling them: “Earth Musings”]

Perhaps the young geniuses on Madison Avenue are products of the violent video generation. The tone of recent television ads makes me wonder—are they selling products or promoting meanness and an even greater lack of civility than already exists? Here are several examples:

Capitol One credit card ads star Vikings whose violence and roughness would never make me want to sign up for anything they’re selling. Swinging guillotines? Pouring hot tar over people? I don’t think so. Does this reflect the caveman mentality that permeates our male culture, exemplified by the recent effort of some politicians to take women back to the fifties and earlier? Continue reading

Byard Lancaster, a Warrior with a Horn

Sagewriters’ Music Director is in Spirit

Byard Lancaster, a Warrior with a Horn
August 6, 1942 – August 23, 2012

Sagewriters is sad at the passing of our dedicated Music Director and Jazz legend, Byard Lancaster.

Byard’s dedication to our work, his commitment to encouraging young musicians and writers – especially those “at risk” – and his ability to connect people around the world, leaves a hole that can never be filled.

A talent recognized globally, Byard entertained from Philly to Chicago to Jamaica to Paris, Mexico, Brazil, Nigeria, Guinea Montreal, and anywhere that jazz was performed. Continue reading

Back in the Groove

Dear Friends and supporters,

First I apologize for my long silence. As some of you know, I was broadsided by a distracted driver over a year ago and am still in treatment for my severe injuries. Sagewriters and the Global Kindness Revolution have been on pause since then. (See below for an update.) I am deeply grateful to those of you who so generously sent me “green energy” through my local bank to help with the bills. Your expressions of support and caring have kept me going. Now, something exciting is happening and I hope you’ll be able to support me once again – it costs only a moment of your time. You’ll have to register but this doesn’t mean you have to do anything more or use Yahoo. Continue reading

Judith is Glowing in Yahoo!’s Women Who Shine

Posted by LinDee Rochelle, Penchant for Penning

Vote for Judith! Women Who Shine

I have a confession to make. I badgered Judith to allow me to guest-blog the first post she’s added here in more than a year. She has exciting news and I get to share it with you!

For those who haven’t heard – there’s a reason for our friend’s long absence from the Trust One Kindness website and this blog – and life in general. Judith has just begun picking up the pieces after a horrendous auto accident in early 2011 that shattered her daily to-do list. Being broadsided by a distracted driver will do that to you.

Judith Trustone, Founder Sagewriters

Judith is a remarkable woman and healer.

But anyone who knows Judith knows she wouldn’t take this setback lying down. Well, at least not mentally. Continue reading